Glossary of Terms

Canada’s national system for describing occupations. Includes skill level of occupations, main duties, educational requirements, and other useful information.

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An industry classification system designed to provide common definitions of the industrial structure of Canada, Mexico, and the United States.

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Canada’s federal immigration body. Facilitates the arrival of immigrants, protection of refugees, and offers programming to help newcomers settle in Canada.

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Nova Scotia’s provincial immigration body. Works closely with IRCC to offer provincial immigration programming.

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Provides wage subsidies to employers from not-for-profit organizations, the public sector, and private sector organizations with 50 of fewer full-time employees, to create quality summer work experiences for young people aged 15 to 30.

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Provides wage subsidies for employers who hire recent graduates.

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Provides wage subsidies for employers who hire recent master and PhD grads for newly created jobs focused on research and innovation.

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Offers financial incentives to small and medium sized enterprises to help hire Nova Scotians who need work experience.

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Offers financial incentives to employers who register and employ apprentices as they progress through their apprenticeship program.

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Principal Applicant
The individual who must meet the immigration selection criteria. The spouse, common law, or conjugal partner should apply as a dependent.
Permanent resident
Someone who has been given permanent resident status by immigrating to Canada, but is not a Canadian citizen.
Foreign National
Someone who is not a Canadian citizen or permanent resident. This can include temporary residents or candidates with no legal status in Canada.
Work Permit

Allows temporary residents to work in Canada.

IRCC: https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/services/work-canada/permit/temporary/work-permit-types.html

  • Open Work Permit: Allows candidates to work for one or multiple employers. Post-graduate work permits and spousal work permits are open work permits.
  • Employer-Specific (Closed) Work Permit: Allows candidates to work for one specified employer.
  • Study Permit: Allows candidates to work up to 20 hours per week during their studies, and full-time during scheduled breaks.
  • Post-graduate Work Permit: When students graduate, they may be eligible for a post-graduate work permit of up to three years.
Visitor Visa
Anyone with a visitor visa cannot work in Canada. If they receive a job offer, they may be eligible to receive a work permit and/or permanent residency through one of Nova Scotia Office of Immigration (NSOI) or Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada’s (IRCC) immigration programs. For more information, visit the IRCC website.
Cape Breton Local Immigration Partnership (CBLIP)
A collaborative initiative working to foster communities that are welcoming and inclusive and to support newcomers to become fully engaged in the social, economic, political, and cultural life of Cape Breton.
A program delivered by a province including a variety of streams to support skilled candidates to be nominated and able to make a permanent residency application. In Nova Scotia, it is the Nova Scotia Nominee Program (NSNP).

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Atlantic Immigration Pilot Program (AIPP)

An employer-led immigration process that helps employers hire and retain qualified candidates. Employers must first apply for designation under the AIPP.

A federal immigration program used to apply for permanent residence in Canada with a variety of economic immigration programs.

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A score from 1-10 for language skills

  • CLB 0-4 – limited language user
  • CLB 5-6 – competent language user
  • CLB 7-10 – expert or fluent language user

IELTS, CELPIP, TEF, and TCF are types of language tests.

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As assessment of education received in other countries. Used to verify that a credential is valid and equal to a Canadian credential.

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